The Usga And Golf’s Odd Governance

“I think we got the best deal that we could, Oberto said previously of that arrangement. As for the future, he said, I think the majority of people are going to want, and are most concerned about, having an 18-hole golf course in the future…they just want to be able to play golf.” In September, the MLC asked the city to double its annual contribution for maintenance costs from $50,000 to $100,000, and then for yet another for $150,000 for capital improvements. The city declined, but following that announcement, at a well-attended public forum at the Montrose Pavilion, enthusiasts maintained that the course must be saved at all costs.” See related story here: http://www.watchnewspapers.com/view/full_story/24346701/article-UPDATED–City–Land-Company-Strike-Deal-for-Golf-Course?instance=search_results The closing deadline was set for the end of May, but with Friday’s approval, could now transpire sometime in March. The Montrose Land Company was first formed in 1961 for the purpose of bringing golf to Montrose and opened and operated the Black Canyon Golf Club as a nine-hole golf course until 1986. It was then, at the request of the Montrose Economic Development Corporation, a group of landowners donated land to the City of Montrose.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.watchnewspapers.com/view/full_story/24577443/article-Shareholders-Approve-Golf-Course-Buyout

As a practical matter, however, individual PGA pros are too busy to spend much time focusing on long-term, good-of-the-game initiatives. Most work for mom-and-pop courses, driving ranges, municipal agencies (your local muni) and private clubs, many with rotating, short-term volunteer leadership. The PGA of America itself is a kind of trade association with no compulsory power. The PGA Tour is essentially a labor union devoted to the interests of its few player-members. Yes, it would love to see more everyday golfers: That might increase attendance at tournaments and the size of its television audience. But the connection is indirect and, in any case, the Tour has little sway over the recreational game except as a role modelan awful one, when it comes to speed of play. What might a single, hypothetical golf authority be able to accomplish?

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304315004579382973580045730

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